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Test Prep & Tutor Questions

Helping you get your child the services they need

Getting Tutoring Help FAQs

Some warning signs: difficulty getting started, sloppy homework, and overall disorganization. Other signs: personality change, diminished self-esteem, or a lack of interest in learning. Learn more on this topic: https://huntingtonhelps.com/resources/blog/5-signs-child-needs-tutoring.

Working with a tutor can be beneficial to your child by: strengthening academic skills, mastering new concepts, preparing for an exam, and building crucial study habits for academic success in school and life.

The initial evaluation gives us the answers. The evaluation is a number of multi-disciplinary assessments to identify academic pain points. It answers where and why your child is struggling.  It allows us to build a roadmap, a personalized learning plan. The plan identifies the total number of hours needed for success. Then together we develop a weekly tutoring schedule. Knowing the total hours and your schedule, we can tell you how long the program will take.

We typically recommend at least twice a week.  During the summer we typically recommend three or more times a week.  In general, your schedule helps determine how quickly your child begins excelling in school.

Because we want to help every child achieve their academic goals and succeed in school, we recommend following the tutoring schedule determined by the evaluation.

Third-party research overwhelmingly supports tutoring as the very best educational option.  See our research and proven results on why tutoring works. Our research plus research done by others says we’re the best.  This includes research done by the Chicago Public Schools, The Los Angeles Unified School District, the Indiana DOE, and others. Policy Studies Associates studied our data and determined students who participated in the Huntington Learning Center program found a positive relationship between tutoring and academic proficiency.  We get great results, because all our tutoring is tailored specifically to your student’s academic needs.

While they may share the same schedule, they don’t share the same personalized lesson plan.  We develop this plan based on your input and the initial evaluation.  We update it based on your child’s progress and performance.  This is true personalization to help guarantee the best outcome for each child.

While we do not assign homework, if your child is being tutored for academic skills, we do assign homework if we are prepping for the SAT, ACT, or a state or standardized exam.

No, when we assign homework, your child should complete it independently.

Absolutely! With your permission we will discuss your child’s academic needs and progress with his or her teachers, school personnel, and other professionals.  In fact, we recommend it as a means to help them understand why your child has become such a different individual – it’s because of the skills, confidence, and motivation he or she is gaining from Huntington tutoring.

Since tutors can be tremendously influential in your child’s life – and the life of everyone in the family – pick with care.  Seek an individual or organization – such as Huntington – that devotes full-time to tutoring students.  Check the recommendations of others.  See website for our glowing recommendations. Talk and meet with the staff to verify their professionalism. While your child is being tutored, meet frequently to get updates.  Ensure the organization is accredited.  Most likely, Huntington is accredited by the same organization that accredits your school. Also read what to look for when finding a tutor.

Huntington's Tutoring Services FAQs

After the academic evaluation (which identifies academic strengths and weaknesses), we discuss its results with you during an initial conference.  During our meeting, we schedule tutoring sessions and discuss payment.  We have competitive hourly rates and offer flexible payment options.

Yes! We have about 300 Huntington Learning Centers conveniently located across the country.

We tutor all grades, kindergarten through grade 12, plus adults, in study skills, reading, phonics, spelling, vocabulary, elementary through advanced math, and science, and more. We prep for the SAT, ACT, GED, ASVAB, PARCC, HSPT, ISEE, state exams, and more.

Yes!  We tutor ADHD students in all areas.  Although we don’t diagnose disabilities, we can help students with disabilities make great progress.

Our unique approach to tutoring includes: highly reliable assessments that evaluate strengths and weaknesses, tailored tutoring programs that are unique to each child’s learning style, and communication with parents. When this approach, we give your child the best opportunity at results. See our proven results.

Progress!  Our students make great progress in a short period of time.  For example, second graders threatened with retention can make so much progress that they avoid retention and, in fact, excel in third grade.  Middle schoolers facing an increase in more complex assignments can strengthen their foundational skills that will help them in high school and beyond. High schoolers who need help with specific subjects – or improved study skills – can begin excelling in class.  When prepping for the SAT or ACT, expect outstanding improvements, where we average 248 points and 5.9 points, respectively.

No contract! You can stop anytime!

About Huntington Tutors

Our tutors have degrees from four-year colleges, plus either state or Huntington certification. Centers are accredited by either Middle States Association or Western Association of Schools and Colleges – the same organizations that accredit the vast majority of U.S. schools.

Of course, if you wish!  However, we have found that the best way to communicate tutoring needs is to meet with our Center Director or other full-time staff.  Here’s the reason:  the tutor knows a limited amount of information – which items the student is using and her or his performance on them.  The staff know this same information – in great detail – plus all of the information you and your child’s teachers and others shared with them.  They are in the best position to make improvements to the tutoring program and to discuss how you and school personnel can help your child.

This depends on your and the tutor’s schedule.  We can help guide you in selecting a schedule to insure your child has the same tutor.  However, because of our systems and procedures, each tutor knows your child’s complete tutoring history and is equally capable of providing outstanding experiences and improvements.

Getting ACT Help FAQs

The ACT scores required for admission vary from college to college.  Contact them for their requirements.  You also can visit with our Center Director to discuss this important topic.

Learn more about national ACT scores.

The ACT is 3 hours and 35 minutes, plus 40 minutes with the optional writing portion. Here is the breakdown: 45 minutes for English; 60 minutes for math; 35 minutes for reading; and 35 minutes for science.

The ACT is offered 7 times a year, in the following months: February, April, June, July, September, October, and December. It is best to start prepping as early as possible. If you have any questions on the right time to start, find a local center near you and speak with one of our specialists.

The ACT has four sections:  English, math, reading, and science.  Each section is scored on a scale of 1 to 36. These scores are averaged to produce an overall composite score of 1 and 36.

The optional writing portion has four separate domain scores:  Ideas and Analysis, Development and Support, Organization, and Language Use and Conventions. Each domain is scored on a scale of 2-12.  These scores are averaged to produce an overall composite score of 2-12 range.

Scores are based on the number of correct answers. There are no penalties for incorrect answers.

Each college sets its own ACT admission requirements. Check with your prospective colleges to determine the score you need to achieve. You decide which ACT scores are sent to prospective colleges.

As many times as you want, although most take it once or twice.  First take it in the spring of your junior year and, if needed, again in the fall of your senior year. Consider retesting if you had any issues during your first test, such as an illness or misunderstanding of test directions, or if you feel your initial scores don’t reflect your abilities. If you take the test more than once, you decide which set of scores are sent to colleges.

Most scores are posted to your online student Web account (through ACT) within two weeks after the test date. If you’ve taken the writing portion, you will be notified when that score is available.

Getting SAT help FAQs

The SAT scores required for admission vary from college to college.  Contact them for their requirements.  You also can visit with our Center Director to discuss this important topic. Find a location near you.

Begin as early as possible!  There’s a lot riding on this test, so your child needs as much help as possible.  First determine the goal score your child wants (or needs) to attain.  Then take a practice exam to determine how close he or she comes to this goal. You can find practice exams in various publications.  Alternatively, we can administer a practice exam.  If your child needs to improve that score, then get the best prep course available – that’s us!

Learn more about the benefits of SAT tutoring.

The SAT is offered 7 times a year, in the following months: March, May, June, August, October, November, and December. It is best to start prepping as early as possible. If you have any questions on the right time to start, find a local center near you and speak with one of our specialists.

After a test date, scores generally are available online in about 19 days and by mail in about 27 days. Scores by phone are released according to the same schedule as scores by web, but there is an additional fee attached.

3 hours, plus 50 minutes with optional essay.  Here’s the breakdown:  65 minutes for reading; 80 minutes for math; and 35 minutes for writing and language.

As many times as you want, although most take it once or twice.  First take it in the spring of your junior year and, if needed, again in the fall of your senior year. Consider retesting if you had any issues during your first test, such as an illness or misunderstanding of test directions, or if you feel your initial scores don’t reflect your abilities. If you take the test more than once, you decide which set of scores are sent to colleges.

The SAT has two major areas:  Evidence-based Reading & Writing and Math.  Each area is scored on a scale from 200 to 800. These two scores are combined to produce an overall SAT score of 400-1600.

Scores are based on the number of correct answers. There are no penalties for incorrect answers.

Each college sets its own SAT admission requirements. Check with your prospective colleges to determine the score you need to achieve. You can decide which scores are sent to prospective colleges.

About The Subject Tests FAQs

SAT Subject Tests typically are offered on the same dates as the SAT.  You may take up to three Subject Tests in one day. You may not take the SAT and a Subject Test on the same day. The Language with Listening tests usually are given only once a year, typically in November. If you are taking more than one test on any date, the Language with Listening test is administered first. Only one Language with Listening test may be taken per test date.

After a test date, SAT Subject Test scores generally are available online in about 19 days and by mail in about 27 days. Scores by phone are released according to the same schedule as scores by web, but College Board charges an additional fee for this service.

Multiple times, but we recommend you take any one test no more than twice.

SAT Subject Tests reflect high school curricula, while the SAT is focused on the skills and knowledge learned in high school.

Right after completing the area of study, when the information is freshest.

Some schools now require the SAT Subject Tests as a way to evaluate top performing students for admission. Check with the schools your student is interested in attending to see if they require or recommend that your student take the SAT Subject Tests. These tests are a great way to show your student’s skill and proficiency of a particular subject and make your application stand out. Learn more by reading our SAT Subject Tests FAQs.

Subject Tutoring Questions

Begin by getting your child focused on the task in front of him or her, perhaps beginning with a short conversation or some easy problems.  Remove the barriers that get in the way of concentrating on math.  It’s difficult to concentrate if he or she doesn’t know the basics.  For example, he or she may not have mastered number facts, has weak computational skills, doesn’t know math vocabulary, or doesn’t grasp basic concepts.

If your child is focused and knows the basics, add explanations when you believe they are needed; otherwise, let your child work through the problems on his or her own.   Throughout, encourage questions.  Learn more about how you can help your child with math challenges.

A tutor can help students understand their subject and excel in school.  Here are some signs that your child may need a tutor:  Grades are slipping or you notice a decline (either gradual or sudden) in test scores in subjects that depend heavily on reading.  If your child puts off projects or postpones homework, this procrastination may be a sign of a larger issue, especially if a child ignores repeated reminders.  Your child is repeatedly puzzled by certain concepts, repeatedly expresses anxiety about a test, or is defensive when you try to help.  Read the full list of signs that tell you when it is time to look for a reading tutor.

Absolutely!  It’s a great aid in helping your child retain what he or she learned during the school year.  And, for those students who underperformed, it’s a wonderful way to help prepare for the upcoming grades.  Review these summer learning strategies to help your child continue learning during summer break.